Accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children

Curriculum

Our curriculum at Long Beach Day Nursery is based on the premise that children learn by doing. We believe that your child will discover and learn by making the decisions needed to work through an activity, rather than being told exactly how to accomplish a task.

As a result of this process-oriented approach, you will find that no two-art projects look the same, and your child will discover many individual approaches to accomplish a task; thus, your child will not be asked or required to complete activities in a specific manner. Rather, we support the interest of each child, helping them to grow in their socio-emotional and cognitive skill development through hands-on experimentation with materials and concepts. Our curriculum is built around ideas of interest to the children.

Each day, there are opportunities for all children to explore materials and create meaningful experiences. We call our curriculum “Emergent Curriculum.” The activities emerge from the daily life of the children and adults in the program, particularly from the children’s own interests; it reminds us that spontaneity always has a place in the environments where young children play and learn. Nevertheless, as the word curriculum conveys, there is also Teacher planning in such environments, there is a curriculum.

Our Emergent Curriculum provides opportunities in several basic areas:

  • Language and Literacy - children are encouraged to talk, sing, listen, or otherwise use language and experience written material. Examples are flannel board stories, books, dramatic storytelling, dictations and puppet play.
  • Mathematical Thinking - children are encouraged to develop a sense of number and quantity. Examples are activities that include counting, determining more or less, larger or smaller, how many, recognizing patterns and shapes and developing a sense of time awareness.
  • Scientific Thinking - children focus on the world they know and understand. Knowledge grows from the child’s innate need to discover. Examples are measuring, comparing, using the five senses, questioning, predicting and analyzing results.
  • Social Studies - children explore the roles of relationships in their world. Examples are dramatic play, block building, recognizing similarities and differences in people, families and professions, and understanding the reasons for social expectations.
  • Personal and Social Development - children are encouraged to develop a self-concept and self-control through interacting with others, problem solving, and conflict resolution.
  • Physical Development - includes large and small motor development, and an understanding of personal health and safety.
  • The Arts - encourage children to express their creativity through art, self-expression, music, and dramatic play.

The day is a blend of child-initiated and Teacher-initiated activities including group time, free choice times, outdoor play, appropriate meals, snacks and rest times.

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